New Private Clubs Embrace Young Creative Class

Facilities such as Soho Beach House in Miami and Common House in Charlottesville, Va., offer co-working spaces, screening rooms, rooftop pools, networking opportunities, and other private amenities in cities in which space is a premium.

“We’ve see a huge jump in the number of the new types of club coming online, as compared to the traditional model,” said Zack Bates of Private Club Marketing, a firm that promotes members’ clubs. “In Los Angeles, you can’t get into Soho House. So others are being built, the Hospital Club, Griffin House and Norwood, to keep up with the appetite for these spaces.”

Read Full Article at Club & Resort Business

Private Members’ Clubs Give Up Armchairs for Workspaces

Ambience of unalloyed comfort gives way to challenge shared office market

Soon after the launch of London’s lavish private members’ club 12 Hay Hill, its boss Stephanos Issaias had to throw out all the sofas and chairs on one of the floors and replace them with less comfortable seating.

Unlike many traditional private clubs, 12 Hay Hill allows members to mix business and pleasure: laptops and smartphones are permitted in its lounges, luxury serviced offices are available to rent. But some of its members, who today pay £3,800 a year for the privilege, had complained that the comfy sofas that were perfect for reclining with a drink or a book, were not appropriate “for holding meetings”, according to Mr Issaias.

Such are the dilemmas faced by a new type of club that is springing up in the UK capital. Dubbed “club-working” spaces, these offer the exclusivity and social networking of the City clubs of old, combined with the work-friendly environment of WeWork, the $20bn shared office provider. The rising popularity of working in places other than traditional offices has been driven by IT that has made it ever easier, and the growing cost of space in London.

The trend is also catching on outside the UK. In the US, city clubs such as Jonathan Club in Los Angeles and New York’s The Union League Club “have been adding co-working areas into their interiors and updating their look to make it more modern” in a bid to attract millennial professionals, according to Zack Bates, chief executive of Private Club Marketing, which promotes clubs and hotels.

Read the full article on the Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/content/292f1f4c-a7aa-11e8-8ecf-a7ae1beff35b

Private Members’ Clubs Give Up Armchairs for Workspaces

Ambience of unalloyed comfort gives way to challenge shared office market

Soon after the launch of London’s lavish private members’ club 12 Hay Hill, its boss Stephanos Issaias had to throw out all the sofas and chairs on one of the floors and replace them with less comfortable seating.

Unlike many traditional private clubs, 12 Hay Hill allows members to mix business and pleasure: laptops and smartphones are permitted in its lounges, luxury serviced offices are available to rent.  But some of its members, who today pay £3,800 a year for the privilege, had complained that the comfy sofas that were perfect for reclining with a drink or a book, were not appropriate “for holding meetings”, according to Mr Issaias.

Such are the dilemmas faced by a new type of club that is springing up in the UK capital. Dubbed “club-working” spaces, these offer the exclusivity and social networking of the City clubs of old, combined with the work-friendly environment of WeWork, the $20bn shared office provider.  The rising popularity of working in places other than traditional offices has been driven by IT that has made it ever easier, and the growing cost of space in London.

The trend is also catching on outside the UK. In the US, city clubs such as Jonathan Club in Los Angeles and New York’s The Union League Club “have been adding co-working areas into their interiors and updating their look to make it more modern” in a bid to attract millennial professionals, according to Zack Bates, chief executive of Private Club Marketing, which promotes clubs and hotels.

Read the full article on the Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/content/292f1f4c-a7aa-11e8-8ecf-a7ae1beff35b

New Private Clubs Embrace Young Creative Class

Facilities such as Soho Beach House in Miami and Common House in Charlottesville, Va., offer co-working spaces, screening rooms, rooftop pools, networking opportunities, and other private amenities in cities in which space is a premium.

“We’ve see a huge jump in the number of the new types of club coming online, as compared to the traditional model,” said Zack Bates of Private Club Marketing, a firm that promotes members’ clubs. “In Los Angeles, you can’t get into Soho House. So others are being built, the Hospital Club, Griffin House and Norwood, to keep up with the appetite for these spaces.”

Read Full Article at Club & Resort Business

 

5 Private Member Clubs Worth Joining 2017

BBC Article: Ever Fancied Joining a Private Members’ Club?

A new breed of fashionable private members clubs are growing in popularity around the world, promising to be more inclusive and diverse than their stuffy older counterparts.

Yet while the newer venues like Soho House, Common House and The Hospital Club certainly have far more youthful millennial memberships, you certainly don’t need to have gone to a posh school or university, they still have high joining fees and strict vetting processes.

So how less elitist are they? And what are the benefits of getting your name on the list? Private Club Marketing’s CEO Zack Bates spoke with BBC business reporter, Jennifer Ceaser for some exclusive insights.

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Social Clubs Thrive by Meeting Younger Demographic

Social Clubs are on the rise. With the new world of social media, Social Clubs might seem an outdated form of interaction but they’re not. They have managed to blend and adapt with the changing media outlets and set themselves up to be in the forefront of social media and business strategy. Not to long ago bringing a laptop of computer into a social club lounge would be frowned upon, but today it’s welcomed. Social Clubs have always been a place where clients and potential business partners meet and discuss future deals and now with added technology they are thriving.

Read Full Article at Verily

Florida: Not Exactly Fifty Shades of Gray

If you think Florida is the land of more than fifty shades of gray, think again!

A recent article in the Tampa Bay Times reports St. Petersburg as the #1 draw for millennials in Florida with Tampa nipping at its heels as the #3 most attractive market for ages 20-34. It appears that millennials (your basic under 40 crowd) are invading Florida.

Since 2010, St. Petersburg’s millennial population has increased 6 percent. Tampa, due partly to the University of South Florida, boasted a 7 percent increase in millennials; that demographic now accounts for 24 percent of its residents.

Curious as to how these statistics have had an effect on private clubs, Private Club Marketing checked in with a few clubs in the St. Petersburg/Tampa Bay area. Here are our findings:

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Are Millennials the Silver Lining?

If there is a bright side to the enduring economic recession that, for now, seems to be receding, it is the degree to which club owners and operators have learned the importance of paying attention to the evolving preferences of Members and guests. The pressures of the recession reinforced that no demographic can be ignored, and that old, misconceptions must be cast aside in the harsh light of new realities.

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