Creative Golf Marketing Ideas for February

February may be the shortest month of the year, but it is filled with events and holidays that are opportunities for engaging content to connect with your members.

Content marketing is the act of creating, publishing, and distributing content — articles, podcasts, videos — for the purpose of attracting, engaging, and retaining customers. In February, content marketers have at least four opportunities: Valentine’s Day, Presidents’ Day, Super Bowl 51, and the Oscars.

nfl golfers

Superbowl Sunday: February 5

On Sunday, February 5, 2017, the Patriots will play the Falcons in Super Bowl 51. An estimated 100 million+ people will watch the game live. Millions will hold a Super Bowl party, and you probably are hosting something at your club as well.

Anytime that you have an event capture a nation’s imagination in the way that this one does, it creates opportunities for content marketing. For example, marketers could publish Super Bowl-related how-to articles, interests reads or videos, like these.

creative golf marketing
Valentine’s Day: February 14

Beyond roses and boxes of assorted chocolates, Valentine’s Day can be a significant opportunity for online retailers. American couples spend about $200 each exchanging gifts — males will spend about twice as much as females — making the holiday an important one for retailers.

Content marketing published around this lovers’ holiday might have one of two aims. First, online stores could simply seek relationships with customers. Second, content may be used to win Valentine’s Day sales.

Companies featuring products that do not make for great Valentine’s Day presents — think fishing lures or building supplies — may opt for the first approach.

One option could be to feature love stories about important customers. These stories could take a couple of forms. Marketers might publish the customer’s own love stories. describing how the featured customers met and what makes their relationship special. You could hold an online contest asking customers to submit their love stories. Pick a few compelling stories, and contact the customers for an interview.

For the second option, content marketers have several options.

 

presidents and golf

President's Day: February 20

The holiday is also an opportunity for content marketing. In fact, nearly any historic holiday can be an opportunity for content marketers to simply describe the holiday’s origin. An article or video about Presidents’ Day could tell a story about the leaders it is meant to honor or explain why the holiday is celebrated in February.

An historic approach is the tip of the proverbial iceberg for content marketing. Consider these examples of what your club's marketing department might publish.

This sort of approach to content marketing is really a form of journalism. In years past, retailers purchased advertisements in newspapers and magazines because they wanted those ads to appear next to stories — content that people wanted to read. Now, rather than buying an ad, retailers are creating the content.

academy award golf

The Academy Awards: February 26

The Oscars or Academy Awards honor achievements in the American film industry. The ceremony has been held annually since 1929. It lets viewers learn more about the celebrities behind the year’s most popular movies.

 

Pipeline Marketing: 3 Ways Golf Clubs Can Improve ROI

Pipeline Marketing is one of the most commonly reported performance metrics for private golf and country clubs. Here are 3 Ways to Measure your ROI.

Resort and Club Member Relations and Marketing Directors point to their pipeline marketing metric with pride because it serves as a sign of accountability and proclaims, “We, as Membership professionals, take our role in our club's revenue creation process seriously!”

If marketing intends to demonstrate accountability, you’ll need to show performance against what marketing invests in. To get your arms around this, look at where marketing program dollars are being spent. If your club spends significantly on sales enablement, pipeline acceleration or renewal efforts, measuring your marketing sourced pipeline is a rough way to demonstrate achievement.

Instead, look at significant areas of investment and ask what they’re expected to achieve. Commonly, marketing is expected to help sales close their pipeline faster, succeed in more deal cycles, and drive client relationships and revenue. But sales has a role in this, too. And some marketing leaders – cautious about asserting too much credit for metrics they don’t own singularly – retreat into sourcing metrics. That’s a mistake – it leaves marketing investment uncovered by metrics that can show marketing impact.

The Right Way to Measure

Demonstrating the impact of marketing when performance is the result of cross-functional efforts requires three elements:

  1. Show performance of shared impact metrics. Whether the goal is increased deal velocity, better renewal rates or improved customer loyalty, you need to demonstrate that the impact metrics marketing invests in are, in fact, improving.
  2. Provide proof of marketing participation. You need to prove that when marketing tactics are accepted by target audiences, impact metrics improve. If marketing isn’t involved, it will be uncomfortably difficult to assert any marketing influence over that performance improvement.
  3. Present evidence that performance metrics change as marketing participation changes. Evidence of marketing impact requires a comparison. Some deal cycles may have light levels of marketing interaction, some may have heavy levels, and some may have no marketing interaction at all. When you compare what improvements take place when marketing is present to what happens when marketing is not, you can develop reasonable proof that marketing is making a difference.

The latter type of metric is commonly referred to as measuring marketing influence. Clubs and resorts new to measuring marketing influence typically begin by measuring what portion of sales pipeline marketing has interacted with. The number of clubs doing this has been trending up in recent years, but only less than 50 percent of marketing organizations regularly measure marketing-influenced pipeline. The other 50 percent of organizations likely have a gap in their measurement approach and the way they prove marketing’s value. And when value isn’t proven, marketing resources understandably come under fire.

The good news is that even if your club isn’t incorporating influence into its measurement system, it’s not too late to start.

Content Marketing for Private Clubs

Content Marketing for Private Clubs: Why Private Clubs Must Resort to Creating Content Like Media Companies

Creating compelling content that engages and entertains consumers has stayed a top priority for businesses for years. That’s why every business, including private clubs, must treat their brand like a media firm and develop interesting content that keeps consumers engaged. But with tastes and trends constantly changing, it can be difficult to determine the definition of content. This is a key question for clubs and hotels, which use valuable time and resources to create the kinds of content that can retain current customers and reach prospective guests. Hospitalitynet.org shared why hotel brands should create content that captures consumers’ attention; we’ve edited to be club specific.

Arriving at Content for Millennials, Mobile Users, and Modern Members

Today, content is viewed as a means to connections. It’s all about helping consumers feel connected to a brand, a lifestyle, a status, and other like-minded members. It’s about expressing the ways a brand reflects a member’s interests and views through its offerings, experiences, value, and convenience. And now more than ever, all of a club’s content must be designed to connect on both broad and personal levels.

But with so many forms of content competing for people’s attention, how can a club make its content stand out? By developing content marketing, that’s engaging and entertaining.

Some club management companies like ClubCorp are achieving these goals through traditional media like Private Clubs Magazine filled with interesting articles. And Marriott International is opting to use new media sources, such as its Digital Content Studio filled with feature films, along with Snapchat campaigns and blogs.

Keys to Developing Content Marketing for Private Clubs Like a Media Company

Media companies know that content must be compelling, continual, and consistent to connect with consumers. All this takes is creativity and surprisingly little expense or effort. The best content comes across as authentic and natural, so try to film on the property and convey the experience at each destination. Consider these savvy sources of content for your hospitality marketing:

•   Post candid club snapshots on Instagram.

•   Produce “insider” videos of club operations, with mobile devices.

•   Film interviews with staff members who can offer great golf, dining, wine, etiquette or fashion tips.

•   List must-attend events recommended menu items or cocktails to attract and inform your members and prospects.

•   Livestream live entertainment and events using Periscope or Facebook Live.

•   Profile each hotel department to offer behind-the-scenes secrets.

•   Spotlight favorite staff members to make them familiar to members.

•   Ask followers for feedback on the kinds of content they want to see.

Should Private Clubs Outsource Marketing or Go In-House?

How dynamic is your current membership/marketing team? Many private clubs are learning that outsourcing marketing responsibilities can be a good idea.

To decide whether you should outsource your entire marketing strategy, part of your efforts, or none at all, you need to really understand your club and its capabilities.

Continue reading

Has Wingtip CEO Found the Balance between Member Value and Member Experience?

Half-store, half-social club, located in San Francisco’s Financial District, has Founder and CEO of Wingtip ClubAmi Arad found the balance of member value and experience?

At PSFK’s Future of Retail 2016 SF event, Arad spoke to how his Club cultivates their community and delivers delight to their customers.

Continue reading

Social Media Tips for Private Clubs

When it comes to private members clubs, it’s safe to say that prospective members seek a club experience just as exciting and engaging as the amenities you’re offering. For this reason, my team and I have always been drawn to unique clubs for their ornate charm and intimate member experience.

As early adopters of social media and a targeted leisure and club following, We've been able to witness what it takes to rock social media for a one-of-a-kind, club. Not only is it important to stay on top of trends in the industry – it’s equally as important to listen to your members and guests on these channels.

Below are a few tips for curating and managing a killer social media strategy for your private club:

Continue reading

Internal Club Branding

We spend weeks, sometimes months, developing our “marketing strategies.” Examining and monitoring our members and incoming prospects. Who are the new members we’ve brought in over the last 12 months and where are they coming from? How are they enjoying the club? What is their usage? Are they bringing in the guests that could potentially become new members themselves? These internal reports are invaluable to the growth of our prospect list and retention of our membership.

However, there is an area that is almost always forgotten in the planning phase of our new year strategy or the restructuring of the previous year’s concept: training staff to understand and reflect our message and brand.

The truth is, branding starts from the inside out. Do your employees believe in your product and the services that you offer? Are they standing 100% behind you in the mission of your brand? Are they living your brand? It is important that your employees are informed and involved in the new initiatives and strategies that take place within your club.

I recently attended a presentation for sales and marketing professionals where the participants were asked to raise their hands if they thought their business would not be around in the next 15 years. Nearly half the room raised their hands! Fifty percent of those business’ brand managers didn’t believe their own message. Now you can imagine that this can only trickle down through the staff culture. If your staff is unable or unwilling to support your marketing efforts, it can have detrimental results. How do you begin an internal branding campaign within your company?

  • Step 1: Synchronize Your Brand Personality, Values and Corporate Culture
    Your marketing team should be working closely with your Human Resources team to ensure that the common values of your company internally and externally are in sync. At your upcoming staff meetings, play quiz games about the history of your club, upcoming events and who the new members are.
  • Step 2: Get Your Employees Behind Your Brand
    Align your criteria for recruiting and rewarding employees with the criteria of the brand value. Look for the right skills and aptitudes that will represent your brand promise effectively. Sometimes the best incentives are recognition. When I was a member relations director at ClubCorp we had a recognition program called “STAR Card.” The Members were encouraged to recognize the staff with these cards when they went above and beyond. Rewards were given to those employees based on a point system for each card they received.
  • Step 3: Reinforce and Repeatedly Explain Brand Values and Behaviors
    Use your internal communication to reinforce and explain the values and behaviors that reflect your brand promise. Your employee newsletter should be similar to your member newsletter, recognize those who are excelling, new hires, new members, promote upcoming events and then quiz random employees about the content in their newsletters. Continuously do this until it becomes second nature.

If you thought the process of involving your staff was not important, take into account that your employees meet, greet, and assist your members in many different ways. They are the face of your brand. Engage your staff right from the start and encourage individual input. Use your staff as a focus group – after all who knows your clientele better than they do? By doing this, you will not only get support from your staff but you will be given insight and ideas that you otherwise may not have considered.